Last edited by Auditor General
25.07.2021 | History

3 edition of Constitutional, legal and political context of the role of the Auditor General or working for the kingdom of Canada found in the catalog.

Constitutional, legal and political context of the role of the Auditor General or working for the kingdom of Canada

With some account of the religious sentiments of the Jews, American Indians, Deists, Mahometans, &c., alphabetically arranged.

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        StatementAuditor General
        PublishersAuditor General
        Classifications
        LC Classifications1988
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 91 p. :
        Number of Pages42
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 10nodata
        Series
        1
        2Discussion paper (Canada.Office of the Auditor General) -- no. 62
        3Discussion paper series -- 62

        nodata File Size: 6MB.


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Ministers must be present in the House of Commons to account for the powers that have been assigned to them, to respond to questions, and to defend the way in which they or their officials have exercised power. The options are a separate vote for each institution, or a separate vote for all institutions as a group. any adaptations or modifications made thereto by or under section 4 of the Jamaica Constitution Order in Council, 1962, or• Provisional appointments to Privy Council.

We recommend that a set of principles covering the accountability of senior civil servants and Ministers be included in the proposed legislation.

Certification of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (CCT 23/96) [1996] ZACC 26; 1996 (4) SA 744 (CC); 1996 (10) BCLR 1253 (CC) (6 September 1996)

If this occurs the corresponding changes should be made in the General Orders which govern the conditions of service of civil servants. Their constitutionally guaranteed independence is explored from two perspectives: financial and administrative independence. was appointed on the advice of the Leader of the Opposition, act in accordance with the advice of the Leader of the Opposition.

that the Governor-General shall act on the recommendation of the Prime Minister after consultation with the Leader of the Opposition. CP XXXIV cannot be relied upon to entrench the existence of traditional authorities.

The Role of Principles and General Principles in the ‘Constitutional Processes’ of International Law

We have mentioned as one of the problems with ministerial responsibility as an effective means of realising parliamentary oversight that the growth and development of government has stretched this nineteenth century doctrine to the limits. In some states, notably those states that follow the and whose political systems derive frommost government functions are guided by constitutional convention rather than by a formal written constitution. 4 The Governor-General acting in his discretion, may appoint to any of the offices prescribed under subsection 1 of this section such public officers as he may select from a list submitted by the Public Service Commission, but-• All parts of a bill must be properly considered• 6 Subsection 2 of this section shall not apply to anything which is expressly or by necessary implication authorised to be done by any such provision of law as is referred to in subsection 4 or 5 of this section.

In our view, therefore, NT 166 does not preclude the establishment or continuation of traditional courts.